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Proofreading and Writer’s Block

072811RevOwl

It might go without saying but before a book is proofread the book has to be written. So forget the proofreader, go back to your book and make sure it’s a good novel, or whatever it is you’ve written. In fact, let’s go back even further and suppose you’ve yet to put finger to keyboard.

We’ll assume you intend to write a novel. Just for argument’s sake.  If you’re like most novelists setting out on creating their literary masterpiece then you won’t know where to start. You’ll be afraid to write a sentence or even a word because it just doesn’t sound right. You might have nothing in your head that’s worthy of mention. It’s all very frustrating. There’s a name for this problem: writer’s block.

Writer’s block amounts to intellectual disablement. It can threaten the creation of a book before work on it before it has begun. But don’t despair as their are a number of ways it can be overcome and here I intend to list a few of them. There will be more very soon.

 

  1. Try writing a page or two about anything at all but do not use any adjectives. This will inspire discipline in your writing and in any event it will get your creative juices flowing.

2.   Consider the characters that will appear in your novel. Don’t create them as you go along. Don’t reveal this or that                 characteristic as you write. You have to know them inside out right from the start. Instead of making them up as you               go, create them before you even put pen to paper. Draw them in your head. Maybe base them on someone you know,               someone with a distinctive appearance. A good idea is to cut a picture out of an old newspaper of someone and make               them your key character although make sure they’re not high-profile and often seen on TV!

3.   Maybe keep a diary of this person’s life. Get to know them, their likes, dislikes, their behaviour, their idiosyncrasies.               It could serve you well in the end.

4.     Go out into the world and sharpen up your senses. This will help your use of adjectives later.

5.     Practise writing dialogue. Often a story is ruined by the characters being interesting but dull and boring when they’re              speaking.

 

These are just a few items to help you get started. There will be more to come.

 

 

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